May 2 2017

Earned Media: Why and How to Market Third Party Credibility

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Content marketing is attracting significant buzz at PR and marketing conferences and is the darling of owned and often paid media. Yet, the heart of public relations and a solid strategic communications plan is earned media. Why “earned”? Because you can’t buy third party credibility.

press

Earned media comes in several flavors: an article placement in traditional media (e.g. Washington Post, CNN or CBS Radio), awards and speaking opportunities. While some speakers earn top dollar to keynote a conference, most professionals are invited to deliver a speech or participate on an industry panel to share their expertise – thereby earning credibility from the conference host.

Awards for personal or program accomplishments are earned by professional success as evaluated by your peers or an expert panel. Based on the strength of your narrative and completion of the application requirements, your work is critiqued to determine if it is worthy of recognition and reward.

Having a reporter tell your story brings credibility that you can’t deliver through sponsored content or video that you produced. Often times, media relations results in a single quote in a larger story. Sometimes, it’s a feature story about a product, executive or community investment. In each instance, there’s tremendous value to sharing the article or broadcast report with internal and external stakeholders.

In each case, the outcome of selling your narrative – a speaking gig, an award or an article – brings earned media to your brand. Many have tried to put a price tag on this third party credibility, but it’s difficult to quantify by traditional ROI measures. Therefore, it’s up to you to ensure maximum visibility for the success.

Here are a few common means to ensure the media story, speaking opportunity or award receives attention long-term.

  1. Post to your website with links and photos. Use a pull quote from the article or award citation to highlight the key message.
  2. Include in your email and content marketing campaigns.
  3. Add award badges to your website, presentation materials and collateral.
  4. Share on social media and include photos and video if available. You can also include sample tweets and Facebook posts in a social media toolkit for influencers who can help spread the good word.
  5. Use these earned accolades in paid media if appropriate.
  6. Highlight in your annual report.
  7. Ask influencers to help share the good news (bears repeating).

The best means to ensuring your audience knows about the great media coverage, heralded speech or much-deserved award is to spread the good news. In my agency days, we called this “merchandizing the results.” Today, it’s about using owned media to promote earned media. Paid media services such as Outbrain and Storify should also be considered to maximize visibility.

A well-rounded marketing and communications plan will address earned, owned and paid media. Each has its place in the PR/Marketing mix. Only earned media, however, carries third party credibility.

Note: This article was originally published on kurtzdigitalstrategy.com.



Mar 21 2017

Spreading Your News: Three Storytelling Basics

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In this post-fact era of fake news and alternative facts, it can be discouraging to rise above the noise and position your executive, company or association as a thought leader. However, the basic building blocks of public relations still apply. Here are a few tips to tell your story.

  • Color your narrative. It’s been true since the ancient Greeks, that pathos reigns supreme to logos. In today’s fragmented media environment, evidence needs an emotional connection more than ever. Personalize the facts so that readers and viewers understand the impact, not just the numbers.
  • Connect to current events. You can do this by writing an op-ed or Letter to the Editor to share your opinion on policy, your association’s research or recommendations. You can be a convener and host a policy briefing featuring prominent voices on the issue. Or send reporters a tip sheet of experts who can comment on the day’s news.
  • Tweet – thoughtfully. Sharing opinions and recommendations on Twitter should be part of your communications strategy. If you want your audience to know you, participate in the online conversation by sharing third party content as well as your own. Use Tweet chats to host a dialogue with issue experts, elevate your issue and engage a wider audience.

These are but a few best practices that you can employ to create common practice and build relationships with your audience and reporters alike.

This blog appeared on LinkedIn March 14, 2017



Mar 9 2011

“Your Fired”

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The following post appeared in the Capitol Communicator, March 8.

Donald Trump’s foray into reality TV has made “you’re fired” an engaging melodrama. But in real life, that’s a very challenging pronouncement.

The recent firing of Kurt Bardella, deputy communications director for the House Committee on Government Oversight, is instructive to all public relations professionals.  From the most junior practitioner to the most experienced executive, we are reminded that we can only be successful if we are credible.

And what is credibility?  At its core, credibility is trustworthiness.  Are you a believable source?  Are you timely and responsive?  Are you honest – when sharing facts and insight – and do you have approval to do so?

For Mr. Bardella, his reputation took a significant hit after Politico reported that he might have inappropriately shared correspondence with a New York Times reporter for a book project – perhaps BCC’ing the NYT contact on emails with other reporters. We will never know specifically the nature of the information, but the Congressional office investigated and concluded his conduct was inappropriate. It was also unprofessional and unethical.

Once Bardella was dismissed from his position, his reputation was permanently damaged.  While I expect that he will, in time, recover from this personal crisis, it will forever be part of his professional history – and Google search results.

Please note, that I do not wish Bardella ill will.  I believe that he will able to demonstrate to future employers that he has learned from his mistakes, which will make him a better practitioner.

What can we learn?  Here’s a refresher on establishing and maintaining credibility.

1)    Honesty is the most important principle of our practice.  Provide information that has been approved for dissemination.  If you can’t disclose facts, say so. Provide a timeline, if you can, for when such information can be made available.

2)    Relationship building isn’t a quid pro quo.  Providing confidential information or sharing information without the owner’s knowledge to curry favor with a journalist isn’t a constructive way to establish a relationship with a journalist. Take time to learn what the journalist needs and be responsive when she calls.

3)    Trustworthiness is essential to provide counsel to senior leadership.  Once you lose the trust and confidence of an executive, you will have a difficult time doing your job effectively.

4)    Follow the PRSA Code of Ethics, which includes among its values the protection of the free flow of information and privacy.

Credibility is an essential part of professional development and advancement. With it, you are a trusted advisor and source. Without it, you risk the pronouncement – “you’re fired.”



Mar 19 2010

PR Career Building

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I recently spoke at a PR/Marketing/Advertising career panel at Georgetown University (before the Hoyas had their embarrassing loss to the Bobcats of Ohio U, where I completed my graduate work). Panelists, representing PR/advertising agencies and corporate marketing functions, were asked to define the profession and offer suggestions for developing a career. Here’s what I shared with the more than 50 students who attended.

Public Relations is: Communications in the public interest. Proactive and responsive communications. The responsibility to promote and protect your organization or a personality. The art of persuasion.

How to build a career?

1)    Identify your goals and be open to unplanned opportunities.

2)    Join a professional organization and one of its committees.

3)    Network.

  1. Practice your introduction. 15-20 seconds about who you are and what you do.
  2. Develop a set of stock questions. Standard: Where do you work?  What do you do? Have you been a member of this group long? Conversational: Could you recommend a book or blog that I should read to build my knowledge? Did you read about _____ story? The writer was very insightful. What do you think? I’m a (name your hobby) and always looking for new ideas. Do you know _____? What is the primary business challenge that you have to deal with? When in doubt: weather, traffic or travel.
  3. Distribute and collect business cards. If you are job hunting, ask for an informational interview and/or if they know 3 people you could call for an informational interview.

4) Have fun.



Feb 26 2010

Crisis On Display

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Chances are you missed this week’s other bi-partisan round table — Cyber Shockwave “We Were Warned” — a war game hosted by the Bipartisan Policy Center and broadcast on CNN Feb. 20 and 21. It was compelling television.

This crisis simulation of a cyber warfare attack that cripples telecommunications, air travel and countless other activities that we take for granted was expertly executed. Participants — former national security officials and advisers from the Clinton and George W. Bush administrations — gathered in a mock White House war room to work through the scenario and prepare a briefing for the President.

Former press secretary Joe Lockhart role played the president’s adviser. His participation was critical to the success of the simulation. His counsel throughout the exercise illustrated the balancing act of sharing timely and accurate information with the public without causing panic. Lockhart’s focus on the effect of both the problem (an act of war by an unknown country, terrorist group or individual) and the recommendations for action (e.g. shut down the cell phone network) were poignant.

The communications/PR function must be at the table to recommend and help formulate policy and protocols as well as plan for information dissemination.

To view the simulation on You Tube, search”cyber shockwave”. If you’ve never been involved in table top crisis exercise, this is an excellent example of a crisis scenario.